"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened" -- Anatole France

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About Us


Adoptions
Adoptions


Lost & Found
Lost & Found


Short On Luck
Short On Luck


Bunnies, Etc.
Bunnies, Etc.


New Beginnings
New Beginnings


Petunia Says
Petunia Says...


pagetitle News & In-fur-mation


ANNOUNCEMENT...

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Announcement

FFF IS GOING MOBILE!


We're Moving

FFF will be leaving the Lafayette Pet Shoppe due to the store's closing at the end of July.
FFF will continue private showings and use our HAVE CAT WILL TRAVEL PROGRAM to show our "Formerly Friendless Felines" until we can secure another monthly adoption site to be able "meet and meow" with our public.

 

AUGUST 2-16

FFF will be CLOSED to make the transition to mobile adoptions.

 

CONSULT our WEBSITES, fffcatfriends.org and Petfinder.com/Friends of the Formerly Friendless for our future SCHEDULES and LOCATIONS.In the van, Let's Go


We look forward to seeing you at our new locations.


PETUNIA and I look forward to seeing you.

 


FFF STAFF


cat in hammock 

Hot Weather Tips
For Your Pet

cats in shade 

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, warn ASPCA experts. Even the healthiest pets can suffer from dehydration, heat stroke and sunburn if overexposed to the heat. If you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.


Visit the Vet

A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm and has a safe flea and tick control program.

Made in the Shade

Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it's hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it's extremely hot.

Symptoms of overheating in pets include:

  • Excessive panting or difficulty breathing.
  • Increased heart and respiratory rate.
  • Drooling/excessive salivating.
  • Mild weakness, stupor or even collapse.
  • Seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomitting.
  • Elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.

Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.



Sweet Pete,
aka S.P.

Our Featured Cat...

S.P.

Sweet Pete came to FFF a very sick boy. He had been living in a smoke filled drug house and had contracted a serious intestinal infection. He had been relegated to an outdoor/indoor scenario, where he basically fended for himself.

 

It took FFF a long time to stabilize his condition but he now is a friendly and affectionate and healthy kitty. Despite his neglect, he seeks human attention and prefers it to other cats. He enjoys a safe outdoor, screened patio where he can enjoy the outdoors but not be at risk.

 

In order to keep his stomach healthy we feed him food designed for sensitive stomachs. Sweet Pete, aka S.P., is patiently waiting for a new beginning in a home that will return his affection forever.



If you would like to meet any of the animals listed on the FFF or Petfinder sites,

you can contact Sally.


Talking Cat

F.F.F. NEWS...

 

F. F. F. has enrolled in the SAVE MART S.H.A.R.E.S. PROGRAM !

(Supporting Humanities, Arts, Recreation, Education, Sports)

 

HOW DOES IT WORK ?

 

With a swipe of each S.H.A.R.E.S. card issued at any participating supermarket , a portion of the qualified purchases will automatically be donated to FFF in the form of S.H.A.R.E.S. points.


The more points FFF earns, the more FFF earns.! Up to 3% of the qualified purchases made is credited to FFF's account with each swipe.

* (Some exclusions apply; purchases not eligible for points are: postage,gift cards, event tickets, ticket master,BART, lotto, fuel, check cashing fees, liquor discounts , charity icon sales, sales tax. S.H.A.R.E.S. cards cannot be combined with other discount cards i.e. gas cards.)


WHERE CAN I GET MY S.H.A.R.E.S CARD..?


Just contact FFF and we can issue your S.H.A.R.E.S card .....FREE.

There is NO registering of your personal information, credit card,etc

You can start using your card immediately at the participating stores...
SAVE MART , LUCKY, FOOD MAXX..

looking in

We will distribute cards, upon request, at our mobile adoption sites on adoptions days/ events and through our HAVE CAT WILL TRAVEL PROGRAM. CHECK OUR WEBSITES for our Events and ADOPTION days and locations, AND/OR we issue them to you via the mail.
CONTACT FFF at (925) 808-8364.

 

LOOK for F.F.F. throughout the community for other distribution sites.


P.S. Save your shopping bag, your cat will love you for it! Free instant cat toy!

Announcement

INTRODUCING...

Petunia Says

Announcement

 

PETUNIA, our FFF cat liaison and my kitty soul-mate, finally has her own column!

 

Petunia

The idea for this column stemmed from comments my husband, and kitty Santa, made one day when PETUNIA seemed to be more in charge than we did...and we found ourselves" living on Petunia time "!

As he pointed out, PETUNIA has very definite ideas about things...and definitely has a mind of her own...and lets us know about things from a cat perspective. It just made sense to give her a chance to " educate" us humans about " all things CAT".

PETUNIA SAYS... will give us an opportunity to share and learn about a variety of topics that can benefit both human and kitty. She hopes to share information on kitty health issues, entertaining , enrichment, alternative medicine and vet care, emergency preparedness, problem solving and many more.

If you have a topic you would like for her to cover, please feel free to email her
in care of sally@fffcatfriends.org. Indicate " Petunia Says" in the subject box.

FFF, and PETUNIA hope that you enjoy this new resource. See her new page at
Petunia Says...

SALLY

P.S.    PETUNIA sends her regards.

Nursing Kittens Petunia Says Mom

 

How and When to Care for and Socialize Feral Kittens

 

When you come across outdoor kittens, you may feel the need to immediately pick them up and bring them home with you, but that might not be the best thing for the kittens–or for you. Here are some guidelines on how to decide if kittens in a colony should be removed and socialized for adoption, and how to care for them should you choose to remove them and raise or socialize them yourself. You can find more in-depth information by ordering kitten care products from our online marketplace. These guidelines are just that, and they should not be used as a substitute for veterinary care.

In addition to the information below, consider looking into Feral Friends in your area. These are local individuals, organizations, and veterinarians or clinics that may be able to help with hands-on advice, information about borrowing equipment, and veterinarians or clinics that can spay and neuter feral cats. Request a list of Feral Friends in your area.

 

 

4. Socializing Feral Kittens

Feral cats are not socialized to people—and can't be adopted. With some time and attention, however, you can work with young feral kittens to help them become affectionate and loving companions. It's not a transformation that happens overnight—socializing kittens is a big commitment—but it's a very rewarding experience.

Kittens who do not have any contact with humans after they are born will be feral, regardless of whether their mother is a lost house cat or a feral cat living in a colony. They will be frightened of people and demonstrate all of the signs of fear and anxiety that an adult cat would, like spitting, hissing, and running from human contact.

To become pets, they will need to be socialized, or taught to be comfortable around people. If the kittens are eight weeks or younger, usually just about anyone can socialize them by following some simple steps. Kittens between two months (eight weeks) and fourth months of age often take more time and skill to socialize. Learn how to determine kitten age.

*Note: Alley Cat Allies does not recommend attempting to socialize adult feral cats or kittens older than four months of age. Kittens who are at least 8 weeks or who weigh two pounds can be simply trapped, neutered, and returned to their colony. Learn more.

Socializing kittens is a big responsibility, but with patience and effort, your hissing feral kitten can become the cat who curls up on your lap for some cuddling. Follow these tips to get organized and gather all the supplies you need.

Do's and Don'ts of Kitten Socialization

Veterinary Care

  • Have a kitten wellness visit at the veterinarian; make sure kittens are FVRCP vaccinated and dewormed if necessary. *Note: Rabies vaccination can't be given until they are four months old.
  • Get immediate veterinary attention if the kittens become lethargic, lose their appetite, or have persistent diarrhea.

Kitten Age

Confinement

  • Keep kittens in a room that can be closed off, like a bathroom or spare bedroom. This will give you easy access and won't give them an opportunity to hide in a hard-to-reach spot. This small space will also calm them and allow them to easily find their food, water, and litter, while keeping any pets or small children away.
  • Use the proper cage to confine your kittens. If they are extremely small, use nylon cages—not wire—so they can't escape through bars. The cage should be large enough to hold a den, food and water dishes, a litter box, and soft, comfortable bedding. See 'Tools of the Trade' below.
  • Provide a safe zone or 'den'—such as a small box with blankets or a feral cat den—in the kittens' cage. This hiding place provides security and gives them a way to feel comfortable and not threatened. Kittens must feel relaxed in your home.
  • Make sure that the room is kitten-proofed, so if they get out of your hands, they will still be safe. You don't want them to be able to crawl under doorways or furniture or into vents—anywhere that is difficult for you to reach, or dangerous for them.
  • Don't confine the kittens to a room with no windows, or a room that is often very noisy. The kittens need to feel comfortable and safe in their environment!

Socialization

Getting comfortable - Follow these tips to make kittens feel more at home.

  • Give kittens an initial two-day adjustment period after trapping before you begin interacting with them too much.
  • Set the kittens' crate up off floor so they feel more comfortable. Felines feel safer if they are higher and not at ground level.
  • Move slowly and speak softly around the kittens. If you wear shoes indoors, consider slippers or socks around the kittens. Don't play loud music or musical instruments.
  • Let the kittens be a part of the household action. Leave a TV or radio on after the kittens have been in your home for a few days, so they become accustomed to human voices and sounds. If exposure to other pets is not an issue, set the whole crate in a busy living room with a TV playing.
  • For young kittens, a ticking clock wrapped in a towel sounds like a mother cat's heartbeat and is very soothing.
  • Kittens will respond to positive experiences. Reward positive behaviors, like the kittens approaching you for attention or after a good play session, and prevent negative experiences like scolding or confrontations with other pets.
  • Gauge each kitten's ability to learn and become accustomed to you. Evaluate each individually—don't go by set rules.
  • Be patient! Spitting, hissing, and hiding are all expressions of fear; do not mistake these signs for aggression.
  • If a litter of kittens are slow to socialize, consider separating them. Isolating the kittens forces them to rely on people. If you can't, make sure you spend quality time alone with each one. Litters can be put back together after a short adjustment period.
  • Don't try to rush the socialization process. Be patient, and monitor the progress of each individual kitten.

Socializing with food - Food is the key to socialization. Providing the kitten with food creates an incentive for the kitten to interact with you and forms a positive association, ensuring that she connects you with the food she loves so much.

  • You may keep dry kitten food out all day. When you feed wet food, stay in the room while the kittens eat it, so they associate you with food and begin to trust you.
  • If the kittens are very timid, try to first give them food on a spoon.
  • Over time, gradually move the food plate closer to your body while you sit in the room, until the plate is in your lap and the kittens are comfortable crawling on you to get to it.
  • Pet and handle the kittens for the first time while they are eating, so they have an incentive to stay put. Start petting around the face, chin, and behind the ears and work up to petting all over.
  • Gradually work up to holding kittens, making sure to reward them with some canned cat food or chicken-flavored baby food on a spoon. Human baby food, especially chicken flavor, is a special incentive for kittens. (Make sure the baby food has no onion—it's toxic to cats.)
  • Don't offer food to kittens on your finger or allow kittens to play with your hand or bite or scratch you. A bite from even a young kitten can be painful and dangerous and it teaches the kittens that biting is acceptable behavior. This rule is especially important when raising single kittens without siblings.

Socializing with touch and play - It's important to get kittens used to being handled at a young age, so they are used to this interaction when they grow up.

  • Devote at least two hours per day for successful socialization. You can do a few long sessions or several shorter sessions.
  • Get down to the kittens' level and play with them; particularly kittens eight weeks and younger.
  • Take time to socialize each of the kittens individually. Handling them away from the group can speed up the socialization process by making them more dependent on you.
  • Hold the kittens as much as possible. Make sure they are close to your body so they feel your body warmth and heart beat. This is especially productive after they have eaten, so they associate you with the food and the cuddles.
  • Use toys to entice kittens to play as soon as they are interested, usually around three to four weeks of age.
  • If a kitten is particularly feisty, put her in a front carrying pack (see equipment list) or papoose her in a towel with only the head out and hold her while doing things around the house.
  • After kittens are comfortable enough with you to fall asleep on your lap or purr in your presence, they can move from the initial confinement space to a larger, kitten-proof room.

Introduce new friends - Your goal is to socialize the kittens so that they are comfortable around all people and pets and will be happy in their new homes, so introduce them to new some faces!

  • As long as all are healthy, you can introduce kittens to an adult socialized cat. Monitor this interaction, especially the first few times, in case you need to intervene. A neutered tom will likely play and groom the kittens, which helps the socialization process.
  • Introduce kittens to as many people as you can to adjust them to strangers and unexpected circumstances.
  • If there are other friendly animals in your household, exposing kittens to them will only help the kittens' socialization, and broaden the scope of potential adoptive homes they would do well in!

Precautions - Even a scratch from a kitten can hurt. Make sure to take precautions to keep both you and the kittens safe.

  • Feral kittens can hurt you if you are not careful; wear gloves or protective clothing if you feel it is needed.
  • Don't take chances. Sometimes you have to scruff kittens by the back of their neck to gain control. Learn how to safely scruff a kitten as shown in the photo. Use your entire hand and gently but firmly grasp the fur on back of neck without pinching, pull the cat up, and immediately support her hind legs.

Keeping Kittens Safe

  • Do not use toxic cleaning products or leave them in the room with kittens, including Lysol®, and wet wipes.
  • For clean-ups, use diluted bleach solutions (one part bleach to 15 parts water) in small amounts.
  • If kittens are in your bathroom, pull the shower curtain up and out of the way, so they don't climb it.
  • Take ALL knick-knacks out of the room (i.e., perfume bottles, soap bottles, jewelry, figurines, etc.)
  • Do not allow very young children to play with or help socialize very young kittens. They are not old enough to understand and react to the temperament and behavior of feral kittens.
  • Don't keep kittens in a room with a reclining chair. The kittens can be injured or killed if they go inside the chair and accidentally get closed underneath.

Tools of the Trade (equipment, etc.)

  • Confinement pens
  • Bedding materials
  • Dens or other safe nesting items
  • Litter box and litter
  • Kitten food—dry and canned
  • Food and water dishes
  • Treats, like human baby food (without onion)
  • Interactive toys, such as balls, rope toys, crinkle toys, and scratching posts
  • Radio (tuned to talk radio), or space in a room with common household noise (TV, dishwasher, vacuum cleaner, etc.)
  • Nylon front pack—hands free vest carrier for socializing
  • Gloves and towels
  • Name and phone number of a trusted veterinarian, just in case!

 

Article Reprinted from Alley Cat Allies©

 


Selling your house?
Buying a new one?
Know someone who is?



Real EstateOur pet friendly supporter / Realtor, Bonnie Andrews, has extended a generous offer to FFF referrals! For every FFF referral that results in a finalized contract with her, she will DONATE 10% of her commission to FFF!


A win win situation for all....a dedicated, pet-friendly Realtor, to work with you to meet your needs, and. you can help our FFF Medical Fund that helps needy FFF fosters and community animals. You can contact Bonnie Andrews at:

 

Bonnie Andrews

Windermere Realty
Email : bonniedanes@windermere.com
Cell Phone: 510-478-8266



S.O.C.K.F.I.P
EVENT...



SOCKFIP Presentation
The SOCKFIP Executive Board met with Dr. Niels Pedersen in a holiday meeting to present him with a check for $11,000 to contribute to his promising ongoing research on F.I.P.

 

Dr. Pedersen updated the Board on his current ongoing research and his partnership with University...

 

P.S. Petunia, in her Santa cape, attended to give us a festive flair and feline approval. However, she was nonplussed with the picture taking, preferring to attend to the admirers off camera... always the diva .

 

Dr. Pedersen's UPDATE:

Dr. Pedersen believes that a vaccine for FIP is not possible. Husbandry practices that can reduce the incidence of the disease have been implemented by many catteries and shelters, but will only have a limited effect. Therefore, his laboratory has concentrated on identifying anti-viral drugs that may prolong life, or hopefully bring about a cure.

 

Collaborations have been underway with researchers at Kansas State University on testing the first generation of protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors inhibit virus replication and are part of the drug cocktail currently used to treat HIV/AIDS.  Preliminary testing of first generation protease inhibitors with activity against FIP virus appear hopeful. Dr. Pedersen is also negotiating with a large pharmaceutical company and researchers at another University to help screen and test a number of compounds that show activity against related viruses that cause SARS and MERS in humans. The goal is to identify several safe and effective drugs that will attack the FIP virus by different mechanisms, mimicking the approach that has been so successful for HIV infection.

 

His research team will also continue to study the nature of FIP immunity and the mechanisms by which the FIP virus is able to evade a cat's defense mechanisms and cause disease. This latter research may identify additional targets for drug therapy.

 

For more info, please visit the SOCKFIP.org website.

 

F.F.F. Recognition...

We are humbled and honored to have received the Rescue Award from SimplyCatBreeds.org for recognition of our efforts to provide rescue services to needy "formerly friendless felines". We have shared their commendation below.


We at SimplyCatBreeds.org are pleased to present you with a Cat Rescue Award for excellence in helping needy cats who just need a warm home and some love. We take pride in acknowledging the best organizations around the country with our special award emblem, recognizing them for their outstanding work - Friends of the Formerly Friendless is absolutely an organization we place among those that need recognition.

Thank you for all the work you and your organization provides for cats in need. We know exactly how difficult and thankless a task it can be, so we hope this little token helps even a little bit.


While we are honored to have received this recognition, our work and story would not be possible without our dedicated and hard working, fosters, community support, compassionate veterinarians and excellent web master/website designer. We will display the award medallion proudly on our websites in recognition of all their efforts to help Friends of the Formerly Friendless in their Rescue mission.


 



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