"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened" -- Anatole France

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Petunia Says...


pagetitle News & In-fur-mation


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cat in hammock 

Hot
Weather
Tips
For Your Pet!

cats in shade 

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, warn ASPCA experts. Even the healthiest pets can suffer from dehydration, heat stroke and sunburn if overexposed to the heat. If you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.


Visit the Vet

A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm and has a safe flea and tick control program.

Made in the Shade

Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it's hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it's extremely hot.

Symptoms of overheating in pets include:

  • Excessive panting or difficulty breathing.
  • Increased heart and respiratory rate.
  • Drooling/excessive salivating.
  • Mild weakness, stupor or even collapse.
  • Seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomiting.
  • Elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.

Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.

 

HOT CAR LEGISLATION PENDING!

 

Current law under 597.7 California PC (excerpts):

 

  • (a) No person shall leave or confine an animal in any unattended motor vehicle under conditions that endanger the health or well-being of an animal due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, or lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal.
  •  

  • (c)(1) Nothing in this section shall prevent a peace officer, humane officer, or an animal control officer from removing an animal from a motor vehicle if the animal's safety appears to be in immediate danger from heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal.

 

Assembly Bill 797 has been proposed which will set forth the guidelines for a regular citizen to take necessary action to intervene on the behalf of an animal in distress without civil liability for property damaged in the course of the rescue:

 

(b) (1) This section does not prevent a person from taking reasonable steps that are necessary to remove an animal from a motor vehicle if the person holds a reasonable belief that the animal's safety is in immediate danger from heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal.

  • (2) A person who removes an animal from a vehicle in accordance with paragraph (1) is not criminally liable for actions taken reasonably and in good faith if the person does all of the following:

  • (A) Determines the vehicle is locked or there is otherwise no reasonable manner for the animal to be removed from the vehicle.
    (B) Has a good faith belief that forcible entry into the vehicle is necessary because the animal is in imminent danger of suffering harm if it is not immediately removed from the vehicle, and, based upon the circumstances known to the person at the time, the belief is a reasonable one.

  • (C) Has contacted a local law enforcement agency, the fire department, animal control, or the "911" emergency service prior to forcibly entering the vehicle.

  • (D) Remains with the animal in a safe location, out of the elements but reasonably close to the vehicle, until a peace officer, humane officer, animal control officer, or another emergency responder arrives.

  • (E) Used no more force to enter the vehicle and remove the animal from the vehicle than was necessary under the circumstances.

  • (F) Immediately turns the animal over to a representative from law enforcement, animal control, or another emergency responder who responds to the scene.

 

This proposed law has been dubbed the Good Samaritan Act. The full AB-797 and it's history can be read at the California Legislative Information Site.


Announcement

ANNOUNCEMENT...

 

Friends of the Formerly Friendless is excited to participate in the AmazonSmile Program. Now when you shop at smile.amazon.com, FFF can receive much needed funds to continue our lifesaving rescue work.

 

 

FFF will receive .5 percent of purchase amount directly to our FFF account. We feel that it is a win-win proposition for all. WE SHOP... FFF CRITTERS BENEFIT!

 

NOTE: AS OF APRIL 1ST, 2016, THE SHARES CARD WILL NO LONGER BE NEEDED. TO BENEFIT FFF

OUR SUPPORTERS WILL NEED TO REGISTER WITH E-SCRIP.

 


Community News!

FIX OUR FERALS SPAY-NEUTER CENTER

THE STORY:

 

Fix Our Ferals (FOF) is a community-based, non-profit organization that promotes trap-neuter-return (TNR) to humanely reduce the neighborhood cat population in the San Francisco East Bay. During our first eleven years from our founding in 1998 until 2011, FOF held 101 "mash-style" clinics at borrowed facilities. Then in July 2012, to meet overwhelming demand for low-cost spay-neuter, FOF opened our own clinic facility, the Fix Our Ferals Spay-Neuter Center.

Our mission is to help both people and cats in the San Francisco East Bay by:

-- Advocating TNR as the only humane and effective method of population control, to replace the cruel and failed practice of trap-and-kill;

-- Providing affordable spay-neuter services to community members and rescue organizations;

-- Educating community members, leaders, and decision-makers about TNR, in order to empower neighborhoods to control and monitor their own free-roaming neighborhood cats.

Over our 17-year history, FOF has opened the minds and hearts of East Bay residents to the plight of feral cats, and provided tools for TNR. 

Our earlier M.A.S.H.-style clinics, staffed entirely by volunteer veterinarians and lay staff, raised consciousness and united caretakers, rescue workers, and medical professionals in the common goal of humane population control.  The hundreds of healthy, non-breeding colonies that have resulted are a testament to the success of both FOF and TNR.

The FOF Spay-Neuter Center is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and staffing, and offers low-cost spay-neuter for all cats: free-roaming, indoor and outdoor, feral and tame.  As of May, 2016 the clinic had been opened four very successful years -- we had fixed over 20,000 cats! Our clinic is currently temporarily closed as we re-organize to become the only organization in the San Francisco East Bay that focuses on high-quality high-volume spay-neuter! 

 

Visit their Crowdrise Page!

 

 

SNIP

(Spay Neuter Impact Program)

 

Upcoming Clinics

SNIP events are held on Sundays several times per year at the Contra Costa County Animal Services facility in Martinez.

 

2016 Schedule

Sunday, January 31st

Sunday, April 10th

Sunday, July 10th

Sunday, October 9th

 

Ready to Register?

To participate in the program, cats must first be qualified and registered prior to an event. It is important to register early as openings are limited and fill up quickly due to the popularity of the program.

 

Get Started

 

Directions  2016 SNIP Flyer


Elwood,

Our Featured Cat...

Elwood in Wheels Bed

My name is Elwood of Jake and Elwood fame. Sadly, we lost my brother Jake to a fatal virus so I am left to carry on. I am an affectionate, loving and active boy who likes to play and roughhouse with active, friendly kitties. But I love "people attention" the best. I would love to come and live with you and another friendly kitty. 

I may be a little shy at first, but will warm up to you as soon as I feel comfortable. I could probably get used to a friendly dog or two also. Maybe I'll see you at adoption day sometime soon? 

P. S. "Don't I look cool in my new "Wheels" bed?"

ELWOOD'S ADOPTION LISTING


If you would like to meet any of the animals listed on the FFF or Petfinder sites,

you can contact Sally.



Ages of our cats and kittens are approximate and may reflect the age
at which the cat entered F.F.F.'s Program.
F.F.F. makes every effort to update the ages of our cats periodically.

When inquiring regarding one of our cats, please ask regarding the current age.



AUGUST ADOPTION DAYS


SCHEDULING ALERT!!!
Adoption Dates Changed Back to:


SATURDAY, AUGUST 13th
&

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14th


1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

at

 

RHEEM VALLEY PET SHOPPE

 

Rheem Valley Pet Shoppe

 

Come join us at the Rheem Valley Pet Shoppe for an Adoption Weekend. The nice people at Rheem Valley Pet Shoppe have invited us to bring our Formerly Friendless Felines to "Meet and Meow" with you, along with our Featured Pet.

 

 

BOARDING is available for fish and small animals. Check the store for rates - (925) 376-8399

 


F.F.F. Policies


Adopting a Friend

An interview, application and home visit is required, followed by a 5-7 day trial visit of the selected pet in the prospective adoptive home. At the end of the trial period, FFF will evaluate the trial visit and determine the suitability for adoption. If deemed necessary by FFF, a final home visit is required. An Animal Care Adoption Contract is required to be signed by the adopter and a legal FFF representative, upon final FFF approval. The adopter(s) must be of legal age to sign a legal contract.

FFF does NOT allow FFF animals to be given as gifts or adopted for third parties.

FFF would appreciate a contribution to help offset our veterinary costs which include:

  • Combo test for FeLV and FIV (feline leukemia and feline AIDS)
  • First FVRCP
  • Spay or Neuter
  • Pain medications for recovery
  • De-worming
  • Flea control
  • Microchip

Special circumstance adoptions are available for eligible adopters.

Micro-Chipping

In an effort to provide our F.F.F. graduates, their families, and our dedicated F.F.F. fosters/staff with peace of mind, we have begun micro chipping all of our adoptees. This will provide a safety net for our formerly friendless felines that go on to their new homes.

F.F.F. is listed as the secondary contact in the event that an emergency or unforeseen circumstance causes them to be lost, stolen or strayed. This should make sure that our F.F.F. adoptees will always have a friend if they are in need and always be "formerly friendless".

Appointments

We show our cats by appointments in the evenings during the work week, either at our adoption site, or your home. Appointments can be made with Sally through our HAVE CAT WILL TRAVEL Program. Availability of the cats or kittens for appointment depends on the availability of the foster and transportation arrangements. If you see a cat or kitten you are interested in on our website, contact Sally via our email or by phone to check on the availability of that cat or kitten for evening appointments.

Adoption Criteria

As a rule, F.F.F. does not offer kittens below twelve-to-fourteen weeks of age for adoption. All F.F.F. cats and kittens are combo tested for feline AIDS and feline Leukemia prior to adoption. Our veterinarians have advised us that the testing for these diseases is not accurate or dependable below twelve-to-fourteen weeks of age. Therefore, we will not release any cat or kitten for adoption until we can be assured of an accurate test result.

It is F.F.F.'s philosophy that we will not knowingly adopt any cat or kitten into your home that we wouldn't place in our own homes. We appreciate your understanding.



Miss Petunia
Petunia Says
Miss Petunia


* SPAY AND NEUTER SERVICES AVAILABLE:
SNIP PROGRAM

 

How and When to Care for and Socialize Feral Kittens

 

When you come across outdoor kittens, you may feel the need to immediately pick them up and bring them home with you, but that might not be the best thing for the kittens, or for you. Here are some guidelines on how to decide if kittens in a colony should be removed and socialized for adoption, and how to care for them should you choose to remove them and raise or socialize them yourself. You can find more in-depth information by ordering kitten care products from our online marketplace. These guidelines are just that, and they should not be used as a substitute for veterinary care.

In addition to the information below, consider looking into Feral Friends in your area. These are local individuals, organizations, and veterinarians or clinics that may be able to help with hands-on advice, information about borrowing equipment, and veterinarians or clinics that can spay and neuter feral cats. Request a list of Feral Friends in your area.

 

 

4. Socializing Feral Kittens

Feral cats are not socialized to people - and can't be adopted. With some time and attention, however, you can work with young feral kittens help them become affectionate and loving companions. It's not a transformation that happens overnight - socializing kittens is a big commitment - but it's a very rewarding experience.

Kittens who do not have any contact with humans after they are born will be feral, regardless of whether their mother is a lost house cat or a feral cat living in a colony. They will be frightened of people and demonstrate all of the signs of fear and anxiety that an adult cat would, like spitting, hissing, and running from human contact.

To become pets, they will need to be socialized, or taught to be comfortable around people. If the kittens are eight weeks or younger, usually just about anyone can socialize them by following some simple steps. Kittens between two months (eight weeks) and fourth months of age often take more time and skill to socialize. Learn how to determine kitten age.

*Note: Alley Cat Allies does not recommend attempting to socialize adult feral cats or kittens older than four months of age. Kittens who are at least 8 weeks or who weigh two pounds can be simply trapped, neutered, and returned to their colony. Learn more.

Socializing kittens is a big responsibility, but with patience and effort, your hissing feral kitten can become the cat who curls up on your lap for some cuddling. Follow these tips to get organized and gather all the supplies you need.

Do's and Don'ts of Kitten Socialization

Veterinary Care

  • Have a kitten wellness visit at the veterinarian; make sure kittens are FVRCP vaccinated and dewormed if necessary. *Note: Rabies vaccination can't be given until they are four months old.
  • Get immediate veterinary attention if the kittens become lethargic, lose their appetite, or have persistent diarrhea.

Kitten Age

Confinement

  • Keep kittens in a room that can be closed off, like a bathroom or spare bedroom. This will give you easy access and won't give them an opportunity to hide in a hard-to-reach spot. This small space will also calm them and allow them to easily find their food, water, and litter, while keeping any pets or small children away.
  • Use the proper cage to confine your kittens. If they are extremely small, use nylon cages - not wire - so they can't escape through bars. The cage should be large enough to hold a den, food and water dishes, a litter box, and soft, comfortable bedding. See 'Tools of the Trade' below.
  • Provide a safe zone or 'den' - such as a small box with blankets or a feral cat den - in the kittens' cage. This hiding place provides security and gives them a way to feel comfortable and not threatened. Kittens must feel relaxed in your home.
  • Make sure that the room is kitten-proofed, so if they get out of your hands, they will still be safe. You don't want them to be able to crawl under doorways or furniture or into vents - anywhere that is difficult for you to reach, or dangerous for them.
  • Don't confine the kittens to a room with no windows, or a room that is often very noisy. The kittens need to feel comfortable and safe in their environment!

Socialization

Getting comfortable - Follow these tips to make kittens feel more at home.

  • Give kittens an initial two-day adjustment period after trapping before you begin interacting with them too much.
  • Set the kittens' crate up off floor so they feel more comfortable. Felines feel safer if they are higher and not at ground level.
  • Move slowly and speak softly around the kittens. If you wear shoes indoors, consider slippers or socks around the kittens. Don't play loud music or musical instruments.
  • Let the kittens be a part of the household action. Leave a TV or radio on after the kittens have been in your home for a few days, so they become accustomed to human voices and sounds. If exposure to other pets is not an issue, set the whole crate in a busy living room with a TV playing.
  • For young kittens, a ticking clock wrapped in a towel sounds like a mother cat's heartbeat and is very soothing.
  • Kittens will respond to positive experiences. Reward positive behaviors, like the kittens approaching you for attention or after a good play session, and prevent negative experiences like scolding or confrontations with other pets.
  • Gauge each kitten's ability to learn and become accustomed to you. Evaluate each individually - don't go by set rules.
  • Be patient! Spitting, hissing, and hiding are all expressions of fear; do not mistake these signs for aggression.
  • If a litter of kittens are slow to socialize, consider separating them. Isolating the kittens forces them to rely on people. If you can't, make sure you spend quality time alone with each one. Litters can be put back together after a short adjustment period.
  • Don't try to rush the socialization process. Be patient, and monitor the progress of each individual kitten.

Socializing with food - Food is the key to socialization. Providing the kitten with food creates an incentive for the kitten to interact with you and forms a positive association, ensuring that she connects you with the food she loves so much.

  • You may keep dry kitten food out all day. When you feed wet food, stay in the room while the kittens eat it, so they associate you with food and begin to trust you.
  • If the kittens are very timid, try to first give them food on a spoon.
  • Over time, gradually move the food plate closer to your body while you sit in the room, until the plate is in your lap and the kittens are comfortable crawling on you to get to it.
  • Pet and handle the kittens for the first time while they are eating, so they have an incentive to stay put. Start petting around the face, chin, and behind the ears and work up to petting all over.
  • Gradually work up to holding kittens, making sure to reward them with some canned cat food or chicken-flavored baby food on a spoon. Human baby food, especially chicken flavor, is a special incentive for kittens. (Make sure the baby food has no onion - it's toxic to cats.)
  • Don't offer food to kittens on your finger or allow kittens to play with your hand or bite or scratch you. A bite from even a young kitten can be painful and dangerous and it teaches the kittens that biting is acceptable behavior. This rule is especially important when raising single kittens without siblings.

Socializing with touch and play - It's important to get kittens used to being handled at a young age, so they are used to this interaction when they grow up.

  • Devote at least two hours per day for successful socialization. You can do a few long sessions or several shorter sessions.
  • Get down to the kittens' level and play with them; particularly kittens eight weeks and younger.
  • Take time to socialize each of the kittens individually. Handling them away from the group can speed up the socialization process by making them more dependent on you.
  • Hold the kittens as much as possible. Make sure they are close to your body so they feel your body warmth and heart beat. This is especially productive after they have eaten, so they associate you with the food and the cuddles.
  • Use toys to entice kittens to play as soon as they are interested, usually around three to four weeks of age.
  • If a kitten is particularly feisty, put her in a front carrying pack (see equipment list) or papoose her in a towel with only the head out and hold her while doing things around the house.
  • After kittens are comfortable enough with you to fall asleep on your lap or purr in your presence, they can move from the initial confinement space to a larger, kitten-proof room.

Introduce new friends - Your goal is to socialize the kittens so that they are comfortable around all people and pets and will be happy in their new homes, so introduce them to new some faces!

  • As long as all are healthy, you can introduce kittens to an adult socialized cat. Monitor this interaction, especially the first few times, in case you need to intervene. A neutered tom will likely play and groom the kittens, which helps the socialization process.
  • Introduce kittens to as many people as you can to adjust them to strangers and unexpected circumstances.
  • If there are other friendly animals in your household, exposing kittens to them will only help the kittens socialization, and broaden the scope of potential adoptive homes they would do well in!

Precautions - Even a scratch from a kitten can hurt. Make sure to take precautions to keep both you and the kittens safe.

  • Feral kittens can hurt you if you are not careful; wear gloves or protective clothing if you feel it is needed.
  • Don't take chances. Sometimes you have to scruff kittens by the back of their neck to gain control. Learn how to safely scruff a kitten as shown in the photo. Use your entire hand and gently but firmly grasp the fur on back of neck without pinching, pull the cat up, and immediately support her hind legs.

Keeping Kittens Safe

  • Do not use toxic cleaning products or leave them in the room with kittens, including Lysol©, and wet wipes.
  • For clean-ups, use diluted bleach solutions (one part bleach to 15 parts water) in small amounts.
  • If kittens are in your bathroom, pull the shower curtain up and out of the way, so they don't climb it.
  • Take ALL knick-knacks out of the room (i.e., perfume bottles, soap bottles, jewelry, figurines, etc.)
  • Do not allow very young children to play with or help socialize very young kittens. They are not old enough to understand and react to the temperament and behavior of feral kittens.
  • Don't keep kittens in a room with a reclining chair. The kittens can be injured or killed if they go inside the chair and accidentally get closed underneath.

Tools of the Trade (equipment, etc.)

  • Confinement pens
  • Bedding materials
  • Dens or other safe nesting items
  • Litter box and litter
  • Kitten food - dry and canned
  • Food and water dishes
  • Treats, like human baby food (without onion)
  • Interactive toys, such as balls, rope toys, crinkle toys, and scratching posts
  • Radio (tuned to talk radio), or space in a room with common household noise (TV, dishwasher, vacuum cleaner, etc.)
  • Nylon front pack - hands free vest carrier for socializing
  • Gloves and towels
  • Name and phone number of a trusted veterinarian, just in case!

 

Article Reprinted from Alley Cat Allies©

 


Selling your house?
Buying a new one?
Know someone who is?



Real EstateOur pet friendly supporter / Realtor, Bonnie Andrews, has extended a generous offer to FFF referrals! For every FFF referral that results in a finalized contract with her, she will DONATE 10% of her commission to FFF!


A win win situation for all... a dedicated, pet-friendly Realtor, to work with you to meet your needs, and. you can help our FFF Medical Fund that helps needy FFF fosters and community animals. You can contact Bonnie Andrews at:

 

Bonnie Andrews

Windermere Realty
Email : bonniedanes@windermere.com
Cell Phone: 510-478-8266



S.O.C.K.F.I.P
EVENT...



 

SOCKFIP Presentation

EXCITING NEWS... PETUNIA and I recently attended the SOCKFIP meeting to receive an update on the battle vs. FIP.

 

A promising new trial study is now underway at UC Davis Companion Health, to test the effectiveness of antiviral drug(s), that could stop FIP from replicating! The study is a two-year study of 40 selected cats with naturally occurring FIP. The study has begun, and we await, with great excitement and promise, the possibility of DEFEATING FIP...

 

FIP is the scourge of the 21st Century in the feline world of medicine. A victory against this disease would be a landmark breakthrough that would save and change the lives of countless cats and their families!

 

SOCKFIP Presentation

As well, a breakthrough in this field could translate to major knowledge and progress in human studies and other corona virus studies!

 

We fervently support Dr. Niels Pedersen and Dr. Brian Murphy in their quest to defeat one of the most insidious and complex viruses of our time!

 

VISIT SOCKFIP for ongoing progress and updates on this, and other SOCKFIP News.

 


S.O.C.K.F.I.P. SEASONAL APPEAL!


SOCKFIP Logo

 

SUPPORT FIP RESEARCH  AT UC DAVIS-SOCK FIP!

We are very grateful for your loyal support to 'Save Our Cats and Kittens from Feline Infectious Peritonitis (SOCK FIP) - funding for FIP Research at UC Davis. PLEASE REMEMBER SOCK FIP in your YEAR END GIFTING and MATCHING GIFT PROGRAMS WITH YOUR EMPLOYER I SOCK FIP is matching gift eligible - 501(c)(3) -#27-1523038.


FIP IS NOT A RARE DISEASE: One in 300 cats seen at veterinary institutions in the US die of FIP and hundreds of thousands of cats die globally each year. Dr. Niels Pedersen has devoted much of his renowned career to FIP research. He has published over 50 scientific papers and reviews on FIP alone. All this hard work is paying off, as great strides have been made in the past few years. There is· much to celebrate in 2015 as Dr. Pedersen nears one of the most important studies to date. SOCK FIP is extremely hopeful that Dr. Pedersen is on the path to frontier the first effective and proven treatment specifically for Feline Infectious Peritonitis.
NEXT MONTH: Dr. Pedersen embarks upon one of the most important studies to date - a field trial commences in January 2016 with protease inhibitors that have proven great promise in the Pedersen lab in arresting FIP. Now it is time to prove efficacy in the field with natural FIP cases. Much arduous and difficult research· has taken place to get to this juncture. Yet there are still more milestones and sizable costs related to proving and clearing a drug treatment for market. If the field trails correlate efficacy, the compounds will then progress to a rigorous and very expensive drug approval process.
Your continued support is needed to ensure there is funding to move this process along, until FIP is eradicated. No amount is too small. FIGHT FIP TO THE FINISH!


Goodbye Nemo.  Fair Winds and Following Seas...

Saying goodbye to beloved Nemo.
Lost to wet FIP 1/16/16.

Together we will SOCK IT TO FIP!

 

YES! I WOULD LIKE TO MAKE A DONATION TO SOCK FIP RESEARCH!
Please make your check payable to: SOCK FIP and send it to:
SOCKFIP
P.O. Box602
Davis, CA. 95617

OR:

Donate with your Credit Card (Amex, Visa, Mastercard) via PAY PAL – on the SOCKFIP.org website, URL: http://www.sockfip.org/donations and click "Donate" Pay Pal link.

 

F.F.F. Recognition...

We are humbled and honored to have received the Rescue Award from SimplyCatBreeds.org for recognition of our efforts to provide rescue services to needy "formerly friendless felines". We have shared their commendation below.


We at SimplyCatBreeds.org are pleased to present you with a Cat Rescue Award for excellence in helping needy cats who just need a warm home and some love. We take pride in acknowledging the best organizations around the country with our special award emblem, recognizing them for their outstanding work - Friends of the Formerly Friendless is absolutely an organization we place among those that need recognition.

Thank you for all the work you and your organization provides for cats in need. We know exactly how difficult and thankless a task it can be, so we hope this little token helps even a little bit.


While we are honored to have received this recognition, our work and story would not be possible without our dedicated and hard working, fosters, community support, compassionate veterinarians and excellent web master/website designer. We will display the award medallion proudly on our websites in recognition of all their efforts to help Friends of the Formerly Friendless in their Rescue mission.


 



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